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.msnbc.com. >> thanks for having me on last hour. >>> thanks to you for staying with us for the next hour. this is the u.s. navy ship buil 1969. the uss mount whitney is a big command and control ship which essentially means it can oversee relyomexpetis at the mita iinlv i it was deployed to haiti, for example, in 1994 as the united states played a roll in ousting the military hunta that had taken over that country. eoiallia, hen john mccain said a alongside the georgians? it was the uss whitney deployed that georgia n part it went to. that's considered to be the most advanced command and control ship that the united states has ever floated. it is where the u.s. has bn running the libyan war out of. between the admiral and a u.s. army general, this is where they've been running the war in libya from. as of last night, the uss mount whitney we think is not going to be the headquarters for the libyan war. that war effort will now be run by nato. the no-fly zone part of it and the bombing gadhafi's ground troops part of it which they call something like protecting civilians. this ship named after the highest
for the next hour. this is the u.s. navy ship built in newport news, virginia, in 1969. the uss mount whitney is a big command and control ship which essentially means it can oversee really complex operations that the military is involved in. it was deployed to haiti, for example, in 1994 as the united states played a roll in ousting the military hunta that had taken over that country. remember when john mccain said today we are all georgians, when russia and the nation of georgia were having a war, and john mccain wanted us to start fighting russia alongside the georgians? it was the uss whitney deployed to bring humanitarian aid. it was the first ship to reach that georgia n part it went to. that's considered to be the most advanced command and control ship that the united states has ever floated. it is where the u.s. has been running the libyan war out of. between the admiral and a u.s. army general, this is where they've been running the war in libya from. as of last night, the uss mount whitney we think is not going to be the headquarters for the libyan war. that war effort will now be r
>> glenn: from new york, good night america. >>> president obama warns muammar khadafy that the u.s. is ready to join an allied effort to protect civilians. a judge in wisconsin blocks the new collective bargaining law from taking effect and nuclear fallout from japan gets an upgrade. live from our studio in washington is special report. >> brett: u.s. ambassador susan rice says muammar khadafy is in violation of resolution that demanded a cease-fire in libya. they called on khadafy to halt military attacks on civilians and if the libyan leader does not stand down, the u.s. will launch military action against him. but he said the summit will not send ground troops into the country. we have team coverage. doug is at the pentagon with the u.s. role and logistics of implementing a no-fly zone. we begin with senior correspondent with rick leventhal who is live in libya in benghazi. >> reporter: it's safe to say that we've seen more check points popping up, more young men with small arms and concern about khadafy's army with libyan official on live television saying that the army was act
and balanced. >> bret: a massive earthquake strikes japan. how is the u.s. responding? now there are concerns about nuclear power plants there. president obama says the noose is tightening around muammar gaddafi but events may suggest otherwise. saudi day of rage, did it materialize? live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." good evening. i'm bret baier. the u.s. and the rest of the world are mobilizing tonight to assist japan, following a massive earthquake and tsunami early this morning. the magnitude 8.9 offshore quake unleashed a 23-foot tsunami. hundreds are believed dead and that number could rise. japan says the power inside the nuclear plant is 1,000 times than the normal level. they lost control over pressure in reactors. waves hit hawaii and the u.s. west coast causing major damage to boats in one california harbor and one person is reported missing. japan's eastern coast saw massive devastation in an instant the office buildings became danger zones. >> i thought i was going to die. >> bret: the magnitude 8.9 offshore quake shook cities and villages up and down j
announcements about u.s. wars, about u.s. military interventions. some of them amounting to small wars, some amounting to very large wars. now that the united states has embarked on its latest new military intervention in libya, i would love to be able to show you the current president's oval office address on the subject, but there isn't one. president obama did make a public statement saturday afternoon that we had started that military intervention in libya, but did so from the confines of a convention center in brazil. eight years to the day that george w. bush stared unsteadily into the camera and announced the iraq invasion, president obama announced his own military intervention, but pointedly declined the opportunity to do it in a way that u.s. presidents usually do. president obama taking all sorts of criticism from the right over the past few days for not cancelling his trade visit to latin america as a result of this military action in libya. and the white house knew that criticism would come. their decision to go ahead with the trip anyway, to forego the chest thumping commander
republican candidate mike huckabee is confused about where the current president grew up. but first, the u.s. is closer to the crisis in libya. tonight two u.s. warships are heading for the waters off libya although for now he says it's not to fight. >> we'll be enter the mediterranean shortly. it will provide us a capability for both emergency evacuations. >> moammar gadhafi is trying as hard as he can to hold onto power. pro-gadhafi troops tried and failed to retake a town neurotripoli currently under rebel control. and one of gadhafi's sons tells cnn the government is trying to talk with the rebels, but the rebel leadership is in chaos. let's start with cnn's international correspondent, ben wedeman, who is in rebel-held city benghazi. the former libyan interior minister says the noose is tightening around gadhafi's neck. tell us where have you gone and what have you seen? >> we headed sort of in the direction of tripoli. what we've seen is that the noose isn't necessarily tightening around gadhafi's neck. it's clear the opposition is in firm control of this part of the country, but if yo
there are people trying it. from tunisia to hosni mubarak, the great u.s. ally of three decades. to yemen, to worries about al qaeda and extremism in that area of the world. he is supposedly our ally against terrorism. even moammar gadhafi, most americans if they think of him at all think of him as a ridiculous cartoon villain. even he has recently been considered an ostensible american ally. whose planes the american military shot down in 1986. a man whose house ronald reagan shot a missile. even gadhafi was made into a supposed u.s. ally by the george call a diplomatic victory after the fiasco that was the fake weapons of mass destruction in iraq. it is hard enough to figure out how americans can best help out popular uprisings of people that want to determine their own future instead of living under a despot. that is hard enough. how do you figure it out when the despot in question is our despot. when he has enjoyed american support, american seal of approval? that's why there was this collective national stomach turning when we saw images of made in the usa tear gas cannisters thrown
will take charge? what role will the u.s. play and did the hundredth vote come too late to stop gadhafi? will gadhafi fight for the death or accept some kind of a deal? we'll try to answer those questions as we prepare to fingt third muslim count -- fight in m country. >>> japanese more or less admit they are overwhelmed. wow. they are ememploying it throw against the wall and see what sticks approach ahead of the u.s. nuclear commission says it could takes wakes to get this under control. score one for the unions in wisconsin. a judge has temporarily blocked that new law shrinking collective bargaining rights. democrats hope that's the first of many obstacles. republicans say it's a speed bump. libya. we know how we're getting in. how will we get out? we start with the growing cry slinsia. richard engel is joining us from cairo. thank you, richard. give us a sense of what's happening as the u.n. begins to take action. what is the condition of the rebel force, especially benghazi. >> reporter: the rebel force is very weak in benghazi and across the country. what happened was the rebels
are tracking severe weather that is making its way across the southeastern u.s. it's already killed one person and injured a dozen in louisiana. >>> a peaceful protest in the ivory coast. one moment a blood bath. just seconds later and you'll see the entire scene as it played out. women gunned down in the streets. the shooters, the government security forces. >>> a new development in the ongoing drama that is charlie sheen. he is taking your questions live. we'll tell you about that. >>> plus the ipad getting competition from blackberry. we're taking apart the playbook and looking at the ipad 2 headed to stores less than a year after its predecessor. i'm don lemon at the cnn world headquarters in atlanta. a lot of news to get to right now. we start in north africa. u.s. military planes are now assisting people who have been stuck in tunisia after fleeing neighboring libya because of ongoing violence. more than 130 egyptian refugees today lifted to cairo aboard two planes. inside libya forces say they repelled pro gadhafi trims attempted to take the city of zawia near tripoli. a look how the u.
he won't have that. >> in a statement to reporters he said u.s. forces won't land in libya and sources tell fox news, attack planes will not be used in the no-fly zone. operation requires american leadership but not that we act alone. >> this is precisely how the international community should work as more nations bear responsibility and the costs of enforcing international law. >> reporter: that should mean a smaller chair of costs that could range from a few million to a hundred million a week. there are reports his advisors were deeply divided over the prospect of military action but he has resisted gig up. he didn't want the u.s. to be the issue in another arab conflict. there were quiet rumbles from 18 men's of congress he briefed but statement to reporters later was aimed at winning over skeptical americans. >> here is why this matter -- left uncheck that khadafy would commit atrocities against his people, many thousands could die. humanitarian crisis would ensue. >> reporter: in language that recalled his predecessor, he also said the word of the international commun
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
that the military is involved in. the uss mt. whitney was deployed to haiti as the u.s. played a role in ousting the military junta that took over the country. remember when john mccain said today we are all georgians? that was when russia and the nation were having a war and john mccain wanted the u.s. to start fighting russia alongside the georgians? during that war it was the uss mt. whitney that was deployed to deliver aid in georgia and the first ship to reach the port that it went to. mt. whitney is considered the most advanced ship that the u.s. has floated. this is where the u.s. has been running the libyan war out of. between the ship's admiral and the u.s. attorney general, this is where the u.s. has been running the war in libya from. as of last night, the uss mt. whitney we think is not going to be the headquarters for the war anymore. that effort will now be run by nato. both the no-fly zone part and the bombing ground troops part which they call like protecting civilians. the uss mt. whitney named after the highest peak will no longer be the place where from which it is run. does t
along the country's northeastern coast. american military officials confirm that more u.s. service members were exposed to radiation today and treated with iodine. but because of the wind direction, several navy ships moved closer to the coast after initial pullback of radiation concerns two major aftershocks rattled japan today, causing buildings to sway in tokyo. food, water and heat shortages continue. correspondent adam housley has the latest. >> they is survived the fifth largest earthquake in history and tsunami that devoured everything in its path. now hundreds of thousands of survivors face nuclear exposure and health dangers that may not show for years. >> 11,000 micro-sievert is equivalent of the exposure you get a year if you live a normal life. if you stay in the place for one hour you may be exposed to 11,000. we have to watch this. >> radiation is leaking from two nuclear reactors along the pacific coast heavily damaged by the earthquake. on tuesday, another explosion shook the region, damaging a containment pool and exposing part or all of the nuclear fuel rods insid
? what role will the u.s. play? and did the u.n. vote come too late to stop gadhafi? will gadhafi fight for the death or accept some kind of deal. answer those questions as we prepare to fight in a third muslim country. and japanese authorities have raised the assessment of a nuclear disaster to a five -- that's three mile island level on a seven-point scale and they now more or less at mitt they're overwhelmed. they're employing a throw against the wall and see what sticks approach in the nuclear commission. it says it can take weeks to get this thing under control. score one for the unions in wisconsin. the judge has temporarily blocked the new law shrinking collective bargaining rights in that state. wow, democrats hope this is the first of many obstacles. republicans say, it's just a speed bump, check it out. let me finish with libya. we know how we're getting in. but do you have any idea how we're going to get out? we start on libya. richard engle is joining us from cairo. thank you, richard, give us a sense of what's happening as the u.n. begins to take action. what is the conditi
on the radicalization of muslims in the u.s., but is it a matter of national security, or a u.s., but is it a matter of national security, or a witch-hunt? captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. >>> the three-week budget battle in wisconsin that has made national headlines appears to be over. it ended swiftly and unexpectedly. republican members of the state senate outmaneuvered their absentee democratic colleagues to pass a bill which sharply limits union rights. >> this is a violation of law. >> the vote caught almost everyone by surprise. by 18-1 the state senate passed a measure stripping collective bargaining rights from most of wisconsin's public employees, handing governor scott walker a stunning victory in the three-week labor standoff. in a statement he applauded lawmakers for taking, quote, a step in the right direction to balance the budget, and reform government. senate democrats had fled the state to avoid any votes, but republicans found a way to push the measure through. they removed all elements of the bill that involved bud
is in recess. we are going to focus on the story from libya. and your calls and reaction as u.s. and allies strike those targets. 202-737-0002, our line for democrats. 202-737-0001 for republicans. for independence, the number to call is 202-628-0205. here are some of the headlines from domestic newspapers beginning with "new york post." "take that gaddafi." "strike one." an air assault, no ground troops, but tomahawk missiles continue to strike those targets. some other headlines beginning with the chicago tribune. u.s. allies are attacking libya. most of it right along the coast. you can see along the mediterranean sea. l.a. times -- attacks on libya. you can see from the u.s. and navy destroyers. operation "odyssey dawn" was the name of the operation. from the "richmond times- dispatch", the u.s. striking libyan forces. and from the "miami herald", libya under fire. you can join the conversation online at twitter.com/cspanwj. caller: good morning. i would like to know what the heck is going on. here we are and another freakin' war. congress is on vacation. who is minding the store? i'm a
clinton told the house foreign affairs committee that there quote no options off limits. should the u.s. intervene? joining me for today's two at the top is the washington correspondent for "time" magazine. it's critical for the u.s. to handle this right. if they do intervene, what is doing it the right way? >> well, they're trying to figure that out at the moment. it's been a long time since the u.s. did active mail temilitary interventions for humanitarian purposes. they did it in the 1990s after the fall of the cold war in places like somalia and vulcans. iraq in the post 9/11 era, made doing that kind of thing much harder because u.s. intervention was seen as the form of aggression. they're trying to strike a balance between the demands to launch humanitarian assistance backed by some form of u.s. military protection and broader international protection with the danger of crossing the line into what might be seen as a more aggressive military intervention into an arab country. >> the europeans have a big stake in this as well. there's a huge investment in oil fields there. there cou
the opportunity to do that in a way that u.s. presidents usually do. president obama taking all sorts of criticism from the right for not cancelling his trade visit to latin america as a result of this military action in libya. the white house knew that criticism would come. their decision to go ahead with the trip and forego the chest-thumping commander in chief theater at the start of a military convention, that is a fascinating and blunt demonstration of how much this presidency is not like that of george w. bush. do you remember when george w. bush campaigned for president by saying he wanted america to have a humble foreign policy? candidates for president love to say stuff like that. >> i don't think it's a role of the united states to walk into a country and say we do it this way, so should you. >> the united states must be humble and proud of our values, but humble in figure out how to chart their course. >> candidates say stuff like that when they are running because americans like that idea. americans like to vote for the idea. we like that kind of talk and we expect it from candidates.
of american commitment to the war and how much the u.s. is willing to devote to that war in terms of money and time and equipment and man power and risk. in terms of america's lead military role in the war thus far, the obama administration has been saying from the start that the u.s. would hand that off in a matter of days, not weeks. 11 days ago in a meeting with congressional leaders, president obama reportedly assured members of congress that the handover would be, and i quote, in days, and not weeks. defense secretary bob gates echoed that time line on board a military plane a few days later to moscow. >> we expect in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we will be a member of the coalition, a military role in the coalition, but we will not have the preeminent role. >> in a matter of days, we will not have the preeminent role. that was over a week ago. fast forward to sunday night when nato supreme allied commander in europe posted this update on facebook, yes, seriously, a facebook update. he said, q
's forces are surrounding the rebels. how involved should the u.s. get? >> gregg: new details now on a major nuclear scare in japan. japanese officials say radioactivity levels very close to the nuclear plant have gone down in the last several hours. this plant facing a potentially disastrous meltdown after an explosion this morning. take a look at these incredible pictures, clouds of smoke rising from up the reactor area. safety officials are scrambling to contain the damage and evacuating 140,000 people in a 12-mile perimeter. adam housley is streaming live with the latest north of tokyo? >> we're about 20 miles from where we were earlier this morning, 70 miles north and to the eat of tokyo, halfway to where the reactors are. the location we are at southern end of where the tsunami came through here. pictures waf been seen the last few days, you can see some of the destruction. car next to me was carried down the street. there is a car over on the distance that was up on the top of fence. in this was a power structure and some sort of a banner that was hanging across the intersection. in t
'll get our first indication of the strength of the event on the u.s. mainland, over the next 15 minutes and that is when forecasts show the waves will reach san francisco. whether or not they'll be damaging, or even noticeable, has yet to be seen. >> japan's east coast, hit with a 23-foot tsunami, shortly after the quake struck. police along the country's northeast coast, report finding the bodies of two to three hundred people, japan railways working to find a missing passenger train. while the government reports the giant wave swept away a ship, carrying about 100 people. >> unfortunately we expect to get more reports like those, 8.9 magnitude quake is japan's worst on record as we say, one of the worst in world history. and rocked cities hundreds of miles from epicenter an spawned dozens and dozens, as we hear it of aftershocks. >> look at one of japan's three nuke we're power plants, that are having some problems right now, the worst in the city of onahana where police ordered evacuations where a fire disabled a cooling system there. no reports of radiation leaking, secretary of sta
community is tightening the noose around gadhafi. the u.s. says all options are on the table. meanwhile gadhafi is striking back in force. they attacked rebel troops in the two major cities closest to the capital using tanks and anti-aircraft guns. overnight government troops tried to retake zawiya, but rebel troops held their ground. >> reporter: as the blood shed in libya moves into another day, the tone in washington has turned decidedly sharper. the white house is now clearly ratcheting up the pressure on gadhafi to step down. troops loyal to moammar gadhafi are fighting to take back territory now in rebel hands. amateur video captured this firefight between pro and anti-government forces in libya's third largest city. the uprising that began last month poses the biggest threat yet to gadhafi, his bloody crackdown has reportedly left hundreds, possibly thousands, dead. still, in an interview with christianne amanpour of abc news gadhafi laughed off calls for him to step down and denied using force against his own people. >> they love me all my people with me. they love me all. >> bu
. >> reporter: president obama ordered u.s. military aircraft to help evacuate foreigners from libya. but he has not ordered u.s. war planes to attack libyan war planes that take off, grounding gadhafi's air zone with a no fly zone. two senators said let's do it. >> i argue for the no-fly zone and i think we could achieve it. >> reporter: but it would not be risk free for u.s. pilots. >> it's not as simple as throwing up a -- moving an aircraft carrier and deploying a bunch of planes. you have to take action to make sure you have air dominance. >> reporter: action to eliminate gadhafi's defenses, his radar and missiles. action that president obama has not ordered. i'm steve handelsman, nbc news, washington. >>> meanwhile, back in washington on the same day the labor department is expected to report significant progress on the jobs front, democrats and republicans are entering another day of talks to try and keep the government up and running without damaging the economy. nbc's tracie potts joins us from washington with more on that. tracie, good morning. >> lynn, good morning. good morning, ever
regime launches air strikes in eastern libya as it battles to regain control. two u.s. soldiers are killed in a shooting at frankfurt airport. german interior minister thomas de maiziere takes the defense portfolio in a cabinet reshuffle. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we begin in libya, where gaddafi has threatened to start a war if the u.s. or nato intervenes in the unrest. speaking at a political rally, gaddafi says thousands of libyans could be killed if foreign powers and to the country. member is in the suez canal are heading toward libya as the u.s. and u.n. high pressure on the regime. forces loyal to gaddafi launched air strikes on a rebel- controlled town in the east of the country. >> dozens of seriously injured rebel soldiers have been admitted to this hospital. pro-gaddafi forces have launched air strikes on the city. the libyan leader attempts to recapture lost territory in the east of the country. inhabitants are fleeing the battles. there were intense clashes further west, in the oil port held by the rebels. gaddafi is striki
now in the murder of two u.s. air men, the gunman confessing to targeting the u.s. military, saying he acted alone, opening fire inside of a u.s. military bust in germany. good morning, everybody the we're sorting through all this again today. i'm bill hemmer. welcome to "america's newsroom" and welcome to arthel neville, nice to see you today. arthel: nice to see you as well, in for martha maccallum. a 20-year-old ethnic albainan from kosovo, we're told he was radicalized over the past few weeks. bill: reportedly yelling "god is great" in arabic before starting with the gun fire. >> reporter: we don't have the identities of the air men killed or wounded, one said to be in critical condition at a hospital in frankfurt right now. it's really difficult to believe that this man, this shooter, who has confessed to killing the two air men was radicalized in the last few weeks, but that is what germany's interior minister is saying. family members who have been interviewed about the suspect, arid uka, say he was a tkwout muslim but that the whole family was extremely proamerican. they live i
the president is being hypocritical because several union workers have negotiating program. we'll analyze. u.s. warships are going to the libyan coast and liberal wants troops to go into that country, wow! >> you borrow my brain for five seconds, can't handle it. >> bill: is it wrong for the media to exploit charlie sheen. does he have a strong legal case against cbs. >> wow, did what does that mean. by winning? >> bill: caution you are about to enter the no-spin zone. factor begins right now. >> bill: thanks for watching us tonight. the drama in wisconsin is still no winner, that is the subject of the talking points memo. americans are caught up in important conflict, cost cutting versus union benefits. 37% of americans favor cutting pay for public union employees but 56% oppose that. the "new york times" headlines reads majority in poll back employees in public sector. but the poll is misleading because 20% of the responds say they are from union households. if you subtract them, those that favor cutting benefits win the poll. wow, "new york times" -- however according to new poll, 42% want
to a defiant moammar gadhafi as u.s. warships head toward the region. we'll go live for the latest on the deadly violence and speak about what's next. >>> ultimatum. a new cbs news poll find the majority of americans back union workers in the ongoing budget battles as governor walker threatens layoffs if democrats don't come back to work today. we're live in wisconsin. >>> and flood fears. after heavy rains and torptds pound parts of the midwest, floodwaters rise to dangerous levels and the worst is yet to come. early this tuesday morning march come. early this tuesday morning march 1st, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to the "early show" here on a tuesday morning, march 1st. >> nice to have you back. hard to believe it's already march. the year is flying by. go want to get you started with the revolution in libya and the very latest there. the u.s. is trying on increase pressure on moammar gadhafi sending warships and aircraft to the region. meantime billions in libya's foreign assets have now been frozen and overnight rebels held off a prolonged attack by pro gadhafi f
the middle east today, as the u.s. says moammar gadhafi must go. >>> protest nation. wisconsin's two-week sit-in reaches a turning point. while riot police are called to a campus in california. >>> and reaction, letting in after a star athlete is kicked off his team for having premarital sex. >>> and good morning, everyone. i'm mike marusarz, in for rob nelson. >> and i'm peggy bunker. it's a critical day in libya, as protesters are now being urged to demonstrate their anger. that turnout could show whether moammar gadhafi still has control. >> and president obama has a tough, new message for the libyan leader. emily schmidt has the details from washington. emily? >> reporter: mike and peggy, good morning to you. president obama says there's a danger of a stalemate in libya that could turn bloody. so, for the first time, he is officially saying how the u.s. weighs in. there are reports of new libyan government air strikes on rebel forces trying to get reinforcements on the ground. now, the rebels are getting verbal reinforcements from washington. for the first time, president obama has public
is the justification for continued u.s. taxpayer investment? in egypt and elsewhere, successive u.s. administrations failed to move beyond the status quo and prepare for the future. we should not associate the protests in jordan and bahrain events transpire in other places. we have failed to effectively use our resources to help build strong accountable institutions that protect basic human rights. this administration's crier decision to cut support from pro-democracy civil groups in egypt and the only fund groups seceded with the mubarak government is a mistake and it must never repeat. then the mistake of the bush administration and continued and that the country -- under the current administration, to get new business with the libyan regime. john's wife, victoria, my constituent, and others are in the audience today. madam secretary, i have a letter that they have written requesting yours and director miller's help in securing information about the role of gaddafi in the 1980's and 1990. some of us objected to the normalization of relations with the libyan regime. this is proof that the oppressor
in tripoli. a u.s. official tells cnn the protesters are well armed and could carry on the fight for some time. that means tanks and antiaircraft guns. >> what war? what war? then we will die. >> everybody using guns before the people. anybody makes a small move, they kill them. >> the heavy fighting caused them to flee for the border. it's causing a humanitarian crisis. many are in tent cities in the tunisian border. police arrived yesterday to try to help the situation. let's get back to tripoli. it's the stronghold and the scene for the fiercest battles we have seen. cnn international correspondent knick robertson joins me. good morning to you. you spoke with gadhafi's son late last night. does he think his father still has control of the country? >> reporter: he thinks his father has control and is going to hold on. the objective is for the army to take complete control before they get into any political reforms and steps to meet the demands of the armed opposition. what's happening 40 miles from here he said is hugely important. it's important because it's going to stronghold rebels
victories, but there's growing concern in the u.s. about who the opposition really is and if they could actually be worse than moammar gadhafi. >>> in the u.s., several states inundated with floodwaters are about to get hit again. we'll tell you just how bad it is going to get. >>> and saving big bucks with online coupons. yes, now we have your interest. we'll show you how to cash in. >>> we begin with a story that has an impact on every household in america. soaring gas prices. the unrest in libya is helping fuel that surge. since yesterday, you're paying on average two cents more for a gallon of regular unleaded. the national average, $3.49. and this is going to shock you. this time last year, the average price for that same gallon of gasoline was $2.72. higher gas prices are tied to the jump in the price of oil. it's above $104 a barrel right now. investors are worried about supply disruption if the unrest in north africa and the middle east keeps spread iing. the fight for libya is now in its 19th day. the violence escalating every hour. rebels capture ras lanuf. but forces loyal to
in mlyangi. >> stock tock closed down over there six percent. >> u.s. naval forces are moving away from japan over fears of troops exposed to dangerous radiation particularly on the uss regan. >> rescue relief remains top priority but thousands of people are evacuated near the fukushima nuclear plant. if you look at it. second hydrogen explosion to rock the plant and the massive cloud of smoke is carrying radioactive conitalination and that is a concern for the u.s. naval ship providing humanitarian assistance. that affects uss ronald reagan a hundred miles from the plant. they detected low levels of radiation and prompted the ship to move further out to sea. in fact, the commander of the fleet. vice admiral, reveals that the ships are being temporarily repositioned and aircraft away from the fukushima dutch nuclear plant. it goes on to report that sensative units were conducted. 17 crew members were exposed to low level activity in the mission and the radio activity was removed from the affected crew by washing with soap and water and no further contamination was detected so far. >> so what
people. >> the u.s. navy -- the u.s. is moving navy ships closer to libya. the pentagon will not say if any american ground forces have been put on a heightened state of alert. let's get to the u.s. response to this crisis. pentagon correspondent chris lawrence joins us from washington. chris, the pentagon is repositioning army/navy ships to prepare for safe zones for libyan refugee you but is there more to it than that. >> reporter: at this point, no. there could be in the next few days or weeks. right now, the state department has already sent some response teams to both egypt, tunisia. there is an option on the table to consider using the u.s. military to sort of set up a corridor to help handle some of the refugees that have been and may continue to stream out of libya. one of the ships that is now at the northern part of the red sea, right near the suez canal is the "uss kearsarge." it can land marines on the ground but one of the u.s. navy's largest floating hospital bays. it has an intensive care unit and six operating rooms and it can handle up to 600 patients. so it could be
, the vapors could be dispersed by the time they make it into the u.s. alisyn: maria, thanks for the update at this hour. bill: from gentleman paint's putting the focus on nuclear energy. san onofre south of l.a. is saying in the event of a quake they have the necessary safeguards. >> our ability to shut it down and maintain it safely. we are not intending to operate the plan during an emergency, but you want to shut it down and protect the public. we can do that. bill: that plant sits on the edge of the ocean. experts say that ocean water is key to the operation of the plant. they pump ocean water into that reactor which has been the backup plan all along. that helps keep the reactor on the inside cool. >> very quickly the wind starts to mix with the release and it becomes dispersed. if it's blowing out to the ocean the risk is immediately diminished. but even if it's being over populated areas very quickly i would see no risk alove the safe level. bill: he says the plant can with stand an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.0 and it's protected by a 25-foot tsunami wall. all critical element
now. megyn: thanks, guys. this is a fox news alert. breaking news from the pentagon, where u.s. military leaders say there is a change of mission in libya. welcome to "america live," everyone. i'm megyn kelly. here's the latest on the situation right new. a senior u.s. defense official saying that military strikes are now going to start focusing on moammar qaddafi's ground troops and artillery. no more cruise missiles unless needed. the pentagon says the battle on the ground is busy, where brigades commanded by qaddafi's sons are "fully engaged." nato warships are patrolling the coast to enforce an arms embargo. live report coming up. new warnings that the situation in libya and across the arab world as a whole now pose a threat to the united states economy. eric bowling and the fox business network picks up that piece of the story. eric? >> reporter: a couple of months ago before anything started in egypt or tunisia, we were talking about the higher price for food. that was when oil went from $50 up to $80. as we speak, $106 a barrel because of what's going on in the middle ea
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